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What Over 1 Million Genomes Tell Us About Psychiatric Disorders

The brain is an enormously complex thing. Trying to suss out the genetic overlap of the disorders that strike it is perhaps even more complicated. Still, the Brainstorm Consortium, a collaboration of researchers from Harvard, Stanford and MIT, is aiming to do just that. A new study put out by the group shows there are distinctions in how psychiatric and neurological disorders relate to each other; some personality traits may even be at play. The study, led by Verneri Anttila, a brain and genetics researcher at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, looked at 25 different brain disorders that had been examined in past studies. These were so-called called genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that look at complete DNA sets from large swaths of the population. The goal of a GWAS is to try and find genetic variations associated with a disease. Primarily focused on these 25 disorders, Anttila and his team combed through over 1 million genomes from populations of European ancestry; about…

Who do you think you are?

Over the years, psychologists studying personality have had no shortage of theories about how it develops and how it affects an individual. Some haven’t gotten much traction. Others once had a strong following but have since fallen out of favor. Take Sigmund Freud, for instance. In the early 1900s, he argued that our unconscious drives who we are. His take inspired others like Alfred Adler and Carl Jung to develop their own views. Although their contributions are important to the field’s history, modern personality psychologists tend to focus on other major theories. Here, we’ll take you through just some of those, as well as popular tests designed to reveal what makes you tick. Personal Construct/CognitiveGeorge Kelly is responsible for this line of thinking, which he published in 1955. He believed the way people act and behave is tied to the subjective ideas they use to interpret the world: their constructs. For example, you’d probably call something a chair if it had four legs, a s…

665 Days in Space and 47 Minutes on TV: A Conversation with NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson

Life is all about bubbles. Every cell in your body is a bubble, a membrane holding together a miniature world of organelles, ribosomes, and genetic material. Your body itself is another bubble, a skin wrapped around a wet, salty interior that carries a distant memory of the oceans in which our ancestors lived hundreds of millions of years ago. And our entire planet is a bubble, a thin membrane of oxygen-rich air wrapped around a spinning rock warmed by a nearby Sun. Being able to perceive our reality this way is one of the gifts of spending time with someone like Peggy Whitson, the poetic yet resolutely humble astronaut who has spent 665 days aboard the International Space Station–the longest duration of any American. Her life story is woven into tonight’s final episode of One Strange Rock, an unusual type of nature show that looks back at Earth from the unique perspective of the space explorers who have left it. But what you can see in 47 minutes on screen only scratches the surface…

Earliest Rainforest Frogs Preserved in Amber

Frogs in a rainforest? Sure, rainforests are home to tons of them. Nothing new there — except that researchers just found four, preserved in amber and nearly 100 million years old, that suggest frogs have been hanging out in that environment much longer than previously shown.

Anura, the amphibian order that includes frogs and toads, has been around for at least 200 million years. But the frog fossil record is spotty, and the earliest examples of the animals appear to have lived in bodies of freshwater within semi-arid, or, at most, moderately wet environments. Until today, evidence suggested that the first frogs to call a tropical rainforest home were no more than 66 million years old. (If that date rings a bell, yep, it’s right around the time of the End-Cretaceous mass extinction that offed the dinosaurs (and many other animals). There is some evidence that frogs were among the beneficiaries of the extinction event: They appear to have expanded in diversity to fill newly vacated ec…

Glowing without batteries, "Millennium · Falcon" model appeared in board iPhone case

Electronic engineering sales, "FLASH M (Millennium Falcon)" designed in the movie "Star Wars" series from the board art miscellaneous goods "FLASH series" using printed board designing manufacturing technology and equipment, - FALCON board art iPhone case "announced. It began selling on TOHO Cinemas' main movie theater and Sanya Shobo on June 29th. An iPhone case that depicts "Millennium Falcon (Millennium Falcon)" that appears in the movie "Star Wars" series on the board wiring pattern. It converts weak radio waves emitted by the iPhone itself into electric power, boosting, so that a single red LED mounted on the upper laser cannon part without batteries glows. Normally it does not shine, and when it emits a strong radio wave it shines randomly. The feature is a precise design that draws on board CAD. In the substrate CAD, since the wiring pattern of the substrate is drawn in a straight line, about 80,000 straight lines are used…